Recent Publications

Dr. Stephen Kingah
Access to Medicines and Vaccines in the South

Ies Book Series: nr. 20

[more info]

How can developing countries maximize some of the beneficial rules and policies provided to them by the EU and international organizations to reduce public health plight in terms of inadequate access to medicines and vaccines? By navigating some of the complex European and international rules and policies that have hitherto been put in place to ease access to affordable healthcare, the author identifies ways in which policy makers and legislators can optimally use extant rules to enhance healthcare provision.

Access to affordable healthcare is a matter that is undergirded by many policy fields. These include intellectual property, research, migration and infrastructure. It equally encompasses a genuine sense of awareness that available healthcare is the decent minimum from which people should not be deprived. This is more so because there are rules and policies which countries of the South can avail themselves of to improve access for their populations.

This book uses the idea of coherence to indicate how policies and rules at the European and international pedestals could be adapted and adopted to assuage the access problems faced by developing countries.

Stephen Kingah is Research Fellow at the UN University Institute on Comparative Regional Integration Studies (UNUCRIS) in Bruges, Belgium. He received his PhD in Law from the Vrije Universiteit Brussel (VUB) while he concurrently worked as fellow at the Institute for European Studies (IES, VUB). He served as visiting lecturer at the University of Strasbourg where he taught a courses on the European Union’s relations with international financial institutions.  He has equally lectured at the University of Amsterdam, the Eduardo Mondlane University in Mozambique, the College of Europe in Bruges and the VUB. He worked as ad hoc administrator in the European Commission charged with the EU’s relations with international financial institutions.

January 2012
book
Peter Burgess
Serge Gutwirth
Access to Medicines and Vaccines in the South

Ies Book Series: nr. 20

[more info]

The concept of security has traditionally referred to the status of sovereign states in a closed international system. In this system the state is assumed to be both the object of security and the primary provider of security. Threats to the state’s security are understood as threats to its political autonomy in the system. The major international institutions that emerged after the Second World War were built around this idea. When the founders of the United Nations spoke of collective security, they were referring primarily to state security and to the coordinated system that would be necessary in order to avoid the 'scourge of war'. But today, a wide range of security threats, both new and traditional, confront Europe, or at least as some would say. New forms of nationalism, ethnic conflict and civil war, information technology, biological and chemical warfare, resource conflicts, pandemics, mass migrations, transnational terrorism, and environmental dangers challenge, according to many, the limits of our ability to safeguard the values upon which European society is based.

This book will provided theory and empirical case detail on several primary issues:

First, one form or another of insecurity motivates the movement of migrants motivating them to internal displacement or to sometimes risky trips to other countries. The correlation between the conditions of economic, health, food and military insecurity can be directly correlated with patterns of migration on a regional and global scale.

Second, some people become insecure while they are on the move. This is particularly the case for irregular migrants. Greater risks are being taken by people trying to move illegally from poorer to richer parts of the world, for example crossing the Mexico-United States border or the Mediterranean from North Africa to Southern Europe. A specific category of irregular migrants for whom this is often the case includes the victims of migrant smugglers and human traffickers. Another category of concern in this context includes those who become stranded in transit countries.

Third, certain migrants are also insecure in their destination countries. This is particularly the case of irregular migrants who work illegally and are often subject to exploitation. Often their jobs are dirty, dangerous and difficult, jobs that nationals are unwilling to take. The victims of human trafficking - andimportant migrant group - are not free to decide on the activities in which they engage. They are often forced into low-paid, insecure and degrading work from which they may find it impossible to escape and for which they receive trivial or no compensation. Finally, and more generally, many migrants, including those living and working in a regular manner, experience marginalization or discrimination.

J. Peter Burgess is Research Professor at the Peace Research Institute Oslo (PRIO), where he leads the Security Programme and edits the journal Security Dialogue, and Senior Research Fellow at the Institute for European Studies of the Vrije Universiteit Brussels. His most recent book is The Ethical Subject of Security. Geopolitical Rationality and the Threat against Europe. (Routledge, 2011)

Serge Gutwirth is the Director of the Law, Science, Technology and Society (LSTS) Research Group of the Faculty of Law and Criminology of the Vrije Universiteit Brussel (VUB), where he is also Professor of law and holder of a research fellowship in the framework of the VUB-Research Contingent.

Book review - Europe, Strategy and Armed Forces: The Making of a Distinctive Power.

Mattelaer, A. 2012 In : European Foreign Affairs Review. 17, p. 161-163 3 p.

Research output: ResearchBook/Film/Article review

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)161-163
Number of pages3
JournalEuropean Foreign Affairs Review
Volume17
StatePublished - 2012

A Coherent EU Strategy for the Sahel

Simon Navarro, L., Mattelaer, A. & Hadfield-Amkhan, A. . A. 2012 Unknown. (European Parliament (DG EXPO))

Research output: ResearchCommissioned report

Original languageEnglish
PublisherUnknown
ISBN (Print)978-92-823-3731-8
StatePublished - 2012

Publication series

NameEuropean Parliament (DG EXPO)

EU Peacekeeping in Africa: towards an indirect approach.

Mattelaer, A. 2012 Paper presented at the ETH-CSS conference International Peacekeeping in Africa: Actors and Missions, Zürich, November 2012. (Paper presented at the ETH-CSS conference International Peacekeeping in Africa: Actors and Missions, Zürich, November 2012)

Research output: ResearchMeeting abstract

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationPaper presented at the ETH-CSS conference International Peacekeeping in Africa: Actors and Missions, Zürich, November 2012
StatePublished - 2012

Publication series

NamePaper presented at the ETH-CSS conference International Peacekeeping in Africa: Actors and Missions, Zürich, November 2012

Conference

ConferenceUnknown
Period1/01/12 → …

Back to the Future?

Mattelaer, A. 2012 In : De evolutie van de Belgisch-Nederlandse Betrekkingen. 55, p. 161-163 3 p.

Research output: ResearchArticle

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)161-163
Number of pages3
JournalDe evolutie van de Belgisch-Nederlandse Betrekkingen
Volume55
StatePublished - 2012

Reviewing the EU's Crisis Management Procedures.

Mattelaer, A. 2012 IES Policy Brief 2012/04 ed. Unknown.

Research output: ResearchOther report

Original languageEnglish
PublisherUnknown
EditionIES Policy Brief 2012/04
StatePublished - 2012

Decision Making in the Field of CSDP.

Mattelaer, A. 2012 Rehrl, Jochenand Hans-Bernhard Weisserth. Defence, F. M. O. & Austria, S. O. T. R. O. (eds.). Vienna, p. 57-59 3 p. (Handbook on CSDP: The Common Security and Defence Policy of the European Union (2nd ed.))

Research output: ResearchChapter

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationRehrl, Jochenand Hans-Bernhard Weisserth
EditorsFederal Ministry Of Defence, Sports Of The Republic Of Austria
Place of PublicationVienna
Pages57-59
Number of pages3
StatePublished - 2012

Publication series

NameHandbook on CSDP: The Common Security and Defence Policy of the European Union (2nd ed.)

Reviewing the EU’s Crisis Management Procedures

Mattelaer, A. 2012 In : Studia Diplomatica. 65, p. 31-37 7 p.

Research output: Research - peer-reviewArticle

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)31-37
Number of pages7
JournalStudia Diplomatica
Volume65
StatePublished - 2012
December 2011
working paper
Selen Sarisoy Guerin

Abstract

In this paper we examine the effect of law on foreign direct investment outflows with a specific interest in the relationship between international investment law and domestic private property laws. Our results indicate that FDI investor is indifferent to host country property rights, hence shareholder protection by law is not a significant determinant of FDI outflows. We argue that FDI, in contrast with other types of capital flows, can effectively mitigate the agency problem through majority ownership and control, hence reduce exposure to ex-post expropriation by the affiliate. On the other hand, FDI investor remains exposed to risk of expropriation by the host government and is strongly sensitive to the enforcement of law in the host country. In contrast with recent literature we conclude that there are no causal relationship between bilateral investment treaties and FDI.

JEL codes: D23; F21; F23; F36

About the author

Dr. Selen Sarisoy Guerin is assistant professor at Vrije Universiteit Brussel and senior researcher at the Institute for European Studies since November 2009. Selen holds a PhD in Economics from Trinity College Dublin. Her research interests include all aspects of EU’s trade policy and foreign direct investment, Turkey’s economic integration, global imbalances and international capital flows. Selen has worked closely with EU institutions, the World Bank and various policy makers in Korea, Canada, the GCC, Taiwan and Southeast Europe, and has published across a broad spectrum of issues including climate change and trade, deposit insurance and international capital flows, investment and political regime.